Bev's Blog

Mon, Oct 20, 2014 10:38 am

I wasn't surprised when my client "Lisa" cancelled a couple of our meetings, because I knew she was working flat out on a demanding project. Her assignment was to organize a large conference and implement a complex media blitz in support of a new kind of product for her company.

From what I read online, the conference and all the surrounding hoopla were a big success. The activity reached a crescendo on a Friday and I looked forward to speaking with Lisa on the following Tuesday, hoping that she would be enjoying a victory lap around the corporate headquarters.

Tue, Sep 23, 2014 10:27 am

The old top-down, command-and-control style of leadership seldom works in today's organizations, where the goal is often to promote cooperation in the midst of rapid change.

To succeed as a leader you must know how to communicate a vision, build a network of relationships, and foster group learning and decision-making. This is true whether you're the big boss or are just learning how to guide a team.

Tue, Sep 2, 2014 8:31 am

While finishing her MBA at a top tier university, Sarah was enthusiastically recruited by a large company. She accepted their offer to join the marketing department. Once there, she connected with a powerful mentor who helped her snag plum assignments. For several years Sarah was the most junior professional in her group, and she enjoyed being treated like a young star.

After a few years, the growing company made a wave of new hires and Sarah began to feel neglected. She said she was stuck with routine workwhile the interesting new projects went to her younger colleagues.

Thu, Aug 21, 2014 9:02 am

"Josh" was general counsel of a federal agency. He came to coaching after a staff survey helped him realize that many of the lawyers working for him felt under-appreciated. And they had real concerns about his leadership style.

Josh's initial reaction was defensive and disdainful. He said, "Grown-up lawyers shouldn't expect to be thanked just for doing excellent work. They get paid, don't they? And when I don't comment they should know everything is OK, because I always tell them when they screw up."

Fri, Aug 8, 2014 10:25 am

"Bob," my coaching client, had recently changed jobs and was unsure about his new team. He said about his staff, "They're great. Really good people. They have a lot of skills. But, somehow, they're not real professional."

Bob liked his new team members and believed they had potential. But, while he couldn't put his finger on why, he felt the team's performance was less than it could be. As he thought about his first year goals, the challenge he took up was to help his team become "more professional."

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